Phil Richardson: Climate change

By Phil Richardson

In all of my 90-year lifetime, I have never seen weather that even begins to compare with what we are experiencing worldwide. Never before in my experience has their been the swarm of tornadoes and high winds such as those spawned continually, wreaking almost unrelenting havoc, death and billions of dollars of property damage.

The number and intensity of tropical storms in all of the oceans multiply each year.

Warmer water never measured to the present degree in the northern and southern temperate zones is affecting the seafood chain, beginning with plankton. Coral reef beds that offer the environmental protection for all manner of protein for many millions of people are dying.

In the meantime, all glaciers are melting, along with the ice in the polar regions, at an alarming rate. An ice shelf half the size of Texas is expected to break off of the Antarctic continent in this decade.

Already, the people in the island nation of Kiribati—once known as the Cook Island group—are evacuating their villages in the middle of the Pacific due to rising water that is expected to soon cover their homes completely.

What more must happen for the people of the United States to accept that the earth has been undergoing a profound and ever-accelerating global warming caused by a greenhouse effect: an accumulation of carbon particulates in our atmosphere?

What have we done recently to ameliorate this situation? For decades, a great number of American wish to either ignore or deny the imminent inundation of low-lying coastal regions. Obeying the advice of his chief strategist Steve Bannon, President Trump has moved to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris accord, an agreement ratified by 151 nations to gradually mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and he has appointed Scott Pruitt to be Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency. While Attorney General of Oklahoma, Pruitt dissolved the Environmental Protection Unit in that State. He does not believe that carbon dioxide is a primary contributor to global warming nor does human activity contribute to the greenhouse effect in any matter.

Since Pruitt is a child of the oil and natural gas industry, his appointment is a classic example of a fox guarding the hen house.

 

Phil Richardson, Observer of the human condition and storyteller, is a retired broadcast executive residing in Tucson, Arizona. He is the author of three books – “Water Dream,” “The Prosperity Coal Company” and “Miguel: Narcotraficante.” All are available at Amazon.com.

“He goes doddering on into his old age, making a public nuisance of himself.” – Joseph L. Menchen

 

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 Southern Arizona News-Examiner